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Sticks and Stones Break Plus Sized Bones


In a culture where the individuals who model the clothes we wear are drastically taller and thinner than the average woman who buys them, it is easy to see how body image issues have become so rampant, particularly among females.  

With society shifting its attention to unhealthy lifestyles and focusing on ways to change them, we are now encouraging women who do not fit the model prototype to embrace their full figured bodies while honing in on how they feel rather than how they look. Many women, especially a plus sized woman, will tell you that it is much easier said than done.

Let us consider where the problem actually lies.  On one hand, stating that size doesn't matter and weight is just a number would ideally solve the issue of women struggling with accepting their body type, but it hasn't so far. 

Beautiful and stylish plus size lingerie and clothing has evolved and improved drastically in recent years, but women are still struggling with the idea of being considered plus sized.  Why would this be the case?  Perhaps, on the other hand, assigning labels that segregate full figured women from women who are not unintentionally cancels out the efforts to accept a woman's body the way it is.  In other words, how do we expect big, beautiful women (often referred to as BBW) to love their bodies when they are still differentiated from other women?

A variety of terms are used to describe the plus sized woman, and it is often difficult and uncomfortable to decide what appropriate description or term should be used.  Rest assured we have heard it all:  Curvy girl, plus sized, chubby, large, fat, voluptuous, full figured, and the newest acronym, BBW.  While sensitivity to the cause is appreciated, what is really important is that a woman is made to feel beautiful regardless of the term used to describe her body.

To tell a plus sized woman that size doesn't matter is false in every sense of the word, especially when shopping for clothing.  It is dismissive of her body, how she feels about it, and the way she wants it to look.  Size and body type are actually two very critical aspects of finding out what flatters a woman's shape and what makes her feel her best.

There are several things we can do to alter our perception of plus sized women and help with the uneasy discussion about a woman's size:

  • Don't tell her that size or body type doesn't matter. While it might not matter to you, it matters to her.

  • Encourage her to buy quality clothing that compliments her body, at whatever point she's at in her life.  Pampering herself with timely hair and nail appointments at a local salon can go a long way in making a woman feel great about herself.  It is also crucial to make sure the clothes she has fits her properly.  Make sure she knows she deserves to feel pretty and trendy.

  • Persuade her to make an effort to live today as though she is already who she wants to be.  This is the best gift anyone can give themselves.  It is common for women who feel uncomfortable with their bodies to put off doing or having things they love until they're thinner or their life is changed in some way.  Change that today.

Plus size lingerie is one example of women's clothing that can either make women feel extremely awkward, or fabulous in every way.  When shopping for plus size lingerie, any woman, but especially a BBW, should try on various types and sizes until she finds what she's comfortable wearing and taking it from there.  If a woman should feel attractive at any time in her life, it would have to be when she is wearing beautiful intimate wear that feels as though it was designed specifically for her body, and flatters her in all the right places.

We understand that embracing a plus sized body rather than ignoring it is a far more effective way to boost self esteem in women everywhere but what about those names?

What about the terminology that we use to describe someone who is 1X, 2X, 3X and more?
 
Is it ok to call people plus sized?

Is it ok to call people fat?  

Is it ok to call people curvy although they may not be curvy at all?


What can we as people everywhere do to ensure that women do not have to use that sing song childlike phrase, 'sticks and stones may break my bones but words may never hurt me'?

Read Part II of Sticks and Stones Break Plus Sized Bones to see what we can do.  Why?  Because every woman at any age, size, shape, or race has the right to feel like a queen.


Eleanor Laing writes about fashion and issues affecting full figured women for FranBlass Plus Size Lingerie

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